Wisconsin Fog Light Laws

Obvious­ly, head­lights help you see at night and help others see you. Howe­ver, if you have been dri­ving during the day, you may for­get to turn on your head­lights at dusk. The key here is that if you have trou­ble see­ing the road or other vehi­cles, you need to turn on your head­lights. If you see other vehi­cles dri­ving without head­lights on, turn on your head­lights to warn them. Law enfor­ce­ment agen­ci­es even recom­mend dri­ving with the head­lights on during the day to ensu­re opti­mal visi­bi­li­ty, but this is not requi­red by law. The best advice is to turn on your head­lights 30 minu­tes after sun­set, 30 minu­tes befo­re sun­ri­se, or whenever you can‘t clear­ly see a per­son or object wit­hin 500 feet. If a Wis­con­sin vehi­cle has free front lights, side mar­ker lamps, or reflec­tors, the­se must be moun­ted at the front of the vehi­cle or on the sides near the front. They must emit amber light. Rear lamps, side-mar­ker lamps or reflec­tors shall be moun­ted at the rear or on sides clo­se to the rear of the vehi­cle. The­se must emit a red color. Hazard warning lights should only be used when your vehi­cle is deac­ti­va­ted or to warn other dri­vers to be cau­tious. Hazard warning lights indi­ca­te to other dri­vers that a vehi­cle is stop­ped on or off the road.

Under sta­te law, a dri­ver must turn on their hazard lights when the vehi­cle is deac­ti­va­ted on the side of the road. Wis­con­sin spe­ci­fi­cal­ly requi­res that vehi­cles tra­ve­ling on public roads and roads at night be equip­ped with a light to illu­mi­na­te the licen­se pla­te. The lamp must emit white light. A maxi­mum of two front fog lamps and two auxi­li­a­ry lamps are per­mit­ted per vehi­cle. 347.26(11)(a)(a) A vehi­cle may be equip­ped with lights that may be used to warn dri­vers of other vehi­cles of the pre­sence of a dan­ger to traf­fic requi­ring unusu­al cau­ti­on when approa­ching, over­ta­king or over­ta­king and, if equip­ped, may dis­play the warning in addi­ti­on to any other warning signal pre­scri­bed in this sec­tion. The lamps used to indi­ca­te the­se warnings at the front shall be pla­ced at the same height and at the grea­test pos­si­ble late­ral distance and at the same time indi­ca­te white or yel­low light or any shade bet­ween white and yel­low. The lamps used to signal this warning to the rear shall be pla­ced at the same height and at the grea­test pos­si­ble late­ral distance and at the same time have fla­shing yel­low or red lights or any shade bet­ween yel­low and red. The­se warning lights shall be visi­ble at night under nor­mal atmo­s­phe­ric con­di­ti­ons at a distance of at least 500 feet. Dri­ving signals con­forming to the requi­re­ments of this chap­ter shall be used or lamps com­ply­ing with the­se requi­re­ments shall be instal­led in such a way as to con­form to the instal­la­ti­on of the turn signal. Only poli­ce vehi­cles are allo­wed to use blue and red emer­gen­cy lights; They can­not be used by pri­va­te vehi­cles or other types of emer­gen­cy vehi­cles. Ambu­lan­ces and fire trucks can use red and white lights, but only when respon­ding to a call.

Tow trucks may use yel­low or yel­low and red emer­gen­cy lights. 347.26(8) (8) Warning lights for pos­tal deli­very vehi­cles. Any vehi­cle used for pos­tal deli­very may be equip­ped with a fla­shing yel­low light or a fla­shing light instal­led in the hig­hest pos­si­ble posi­ti­on indi­ca­ting at the front and rear that it may only be used to warn other moto­rists of the pre­sence of a dan­ger to motor traf­fic requi­ring unusu­al cau­ti­on when approa­ching, over­ta­king or over­ta­king; if the vehi­cle is used for pos­tal deli­very. 347.26 Restric­tions on Cer­tain Optio­nal Ligh­t­ing Devices. 347.26(7) (7) Warning lamps for cer­tain road vehi­cles. Any vehi­cle of the depart­ment or of a district or com­mu­ne road aut­ho­ri­ty which, by its use on a public high­way, pres­ents a dan­ger to motor traf­fic requi­ring unusu­al cau­ti­on when approa­ching, over­ta­king or over­ta­king, may be equip­ped with a fla­shing red or yel­low dome light or 2 red or yel­low fla­shing lights; One points for­ward and the other back­ward. The­se lamps shall be loca­ted appro­xi­mate­ly half­way bet­ween the outer extre­mi­ties of the vehi­cle and the hig­hest pos­si­ble point and shall only be used to warn dri­vers of other vehi­cles of the exis­tence of the dan­ger to the road. Motor­cy­cles must ride with the head­lights on at all hours of the day or night. Bad wea­ther like rain, fog and snow makes it dif­fi­cult to see others and for others to see you. In 2016, the Wis­con­sin Sta­te Legis­la­tu­re intro­du­ced the Light­house Visi­bi­li­ty Act. The law sta­tes that dri­vers must turn on their head­lights if wea­ther con­di­ti­ons limit visibility.

Restric­ted visi­bi­li­ty means that objects wit­hin 500 feet of the vehi­cle are not visi­ble. Fail­u­re to com­ply with the law could result in a ticket cos­ting $160. Accord­ing to the AAA Digest of Motor Laws web­site, Hawaii and Ken­tu­cky are the only sta­tes that don‘t need head­lights on in bad wea­ther or limi­ted visi­bi­li­ty. Wis­con­sin laws deter­mi­ne which vehi­cles can use emer­gen­cy lights (pul­sed, rota­ting, or fla­shing lights) and which colo­red lights are allo­wed on dif­fe­rent types of emer­gen­cy vehi­cles. Emer­gen­cy vehi­cles inclu­de all vehi­cles dri­ven by law enfor­ce­ment, fire­figh­ters or emer­gen­cy ser­vices, inclu­ding ambu­lan­ces. The term inclu­des vol­un­teer fire­figh­ters, federal bomb squads, pre­ser­va­ti­on vehi­cles, organ trans­port teams, and local, sta­te, and regio­nal emer­gen­cy vehi­cles. The­se emer­gen­cy vehi­cles may use pul­sa­ting, rota­ting, oscil­la­ting or fla­shing devices. For snow­mo­bi­les, head­lights should be used when it is dark and when dri­ving on a high­way. 347.26(6)(a)(a) Every vehi­cle that, by rea­son of its use on a high­way, pres­ents a dan­ger to motor vehi­cle traf­fic requi­ring unusu­al cau­ti­on when approa­ching, pas­sing or pas­sing shall be equip­ped with a fla­shing or rota­ting yel­low dome light at the hig­hest pos­si­ble point visi­ble at a distance of 500 feet. or 2 fla­shing yel­low lights, one for­ward and one rear­ward, visi­ble at a distance of 500 feet and moun­ted appro­xi­mate­ly half­way bet­ween the ends of the width of the vehi­cle and at the hig­hest pos­si­ble point.